Food

Critter of the Week: Crabs!

It’s a new week here at Tree Limin’ Extreme, and therefore we have a new Critter of the Week. This week we are gonna take a look at some of the Virgin Islands crabs.

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A hermit crab found on a trail in Virgin Islands National Park

Hermit Crabs are a group of crab species found all over the world. There are about 1100 hermit crab species. Most live in marine environments, but the ones most commonly encountered here in the Virgin Islands are of the land loving variety. Hermit are related to other crabs, but they differ in that they carry around their home on their backs. Their abdomen does not have the hard shell of the rest of their body, and so it is vulnerable to injury and predators. They remedy this by finding the discarded shells of other sea creatures (most often sea snails), and crawling inside. Hermit crabs can be found all over the Virgin Islands, although always near to the water, which they need to reproduce. The are also mostly nocturnal.

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Ghost Crab at Salt Pond Bay, Virgin Islands National Park

Ghost crabs, or sand crabs, are common along our beautiful white sand beaches. Called ghost crabs because of their pale color and nocturnal nature, they are mostly seen quickly scurrying down the sand. They are responsible for the holes found dug in the moist areas of the beach. The crab uses these burrows to escape the hottest part of the day, and to spend the cooler winters in some areas. They come out at night to feed on clams, and other smaller crabs. They are also a natural predator of sea turtle hatchlings. You can try to catch them if you see one, but they sure are fast!

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A Land Crab found in Christiansted National Historic Site, St. Croix

Several species of so called “land crabs” are also native in the Virgin Islands. Also called pond crabs, in the British Virgin Islands, they can grow quite large and are a popular food source here. They are the main ingredient in the popular dish called “Crab and Rice.” They can most often be found near muddy holes along the edges of mangrove swamps, salt ponds, or other perpetually damp areas. The crabs mainly live on land, having organs that get oxygen from the air rather than the water, but these crabs still live and feed near the water. Keep a lookout for these large crabs, and be sure to try some crab and rice if you can, it is a rare treat!

Stay Extreme!

-The TLE Carcinology Department

www.ziplinestthomas.com

Categories: Culture, Food, Other Islands, Virgin Islands, Virgin Islands National Park, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What do you think?

We want to know what you guys would like to read here on the blog. We have some cool posts in the works about travel, surfing, climbing, and exploring. But what do you want? Is there an island you want to know more about? Perhaps and extreme sport you want us to feature? It’s all about you! Our guides and friends are a really talented bunch of folks and the possibilities are endless. So let us know in the comments what you would like to read about, and we will try to get right on it.

Remember to Stay Extreme!

-The TLE Crew

Categories: Adventure, Culture, Diving, Extreme Sports, Food, Hiking, Other Islands, Plants, Rock Climbing, Sailing, Sports, Stand Up Paddling, Surfing, Tree Limin' Extreme, Twitter, Video, Virgin Islands, Virgin Islands National Park, Weather, Wildlife, Ziplining | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Plant of the Week: Soursop

In this installment of plant of the week, we are again checking out a popular fruit here in the Islands. This is the Soursop:

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The soursop is an evergreen tree native to Mexico. It now grows throughout the tropics from the Caribbean and Africa, to Southeast Asia. The tree is adapted only to warm climates, and cannot grow in areas with cold winters.

The soursop is also know as a guanabana, graviola, or a Brazilian paw paw. The last name is a reference to the fact that the soursop is indeed related to the paw paw tree. The tree produces a large fruit that has become a popular edible in the tropics. The fruit is even mentioned in Sri Lankan mythology. The fruit is large, green, and has the appearance of being covered in spines. Inside, the white pulp is edible, and is highly prized for it’s tasty juice. Some say it tastes like a cross between strawberry, pineapple, and citrus.

The soursop is not just prized for it’s flavor though. In virtually all of the areas in which it grows, it is highly sought after as a herbal remedy. The fruit, seeds, and leaves all have a variety of uses in traditional and herbal medicine. There have also been recent scientific studies that have found that certain soursop extracts may have cancer fighting properties.

Soursop is very popular here in the Virgin Islands. They can be found at many fruitstands and markets all around our islands. If you want some adventure with your soursop come see us at Tree Limin’ Extreme. Our ziplines are located in a rainforest with a variety of tropical plants and fruits. We even have soursop! But be sure to call for reservations at 340-777-9477.

Stay Extreme!

-The TLE Garden Club

www.ziplinestthomas.com

Categories: Culture, Food, Plants, Virgin Islands | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Plant of the Week: Genips

A branch of genips

This is the first of a weekly series of posts that will help everyone to learn a little more about our islands. Every week we will highlight an interesting plant, animal, and local island. Check back for updates every week!

For this week we are featuring the Genip. Also known as a quenepa, spanish lime, or mamoncillo. It grows throughout the tropics around the world.

The fruit grow on large trees and can be found, most commonly, along roadsides throughout the Virgin Islands. The fruit are small, slightly smaller than a golf ball, and are bright green when ripe. The season for genips is short, only a couple months in late summer. They are eaten raw by removing the outer skin, and putting the rest into your mouth and scraping the flesh of the fruit off of the large pit with your teeth. They taste like a sweeter, but still tangy lime.

You can find genips being sold by the branch all over the roadsides and in fruit stands during the season. They are best enjoyed with friends on a hot summer evening, and preferably on a beach.

If you come to visit our zipline here during genip season, we may have some around to sample, along with a variety of other native fruits. Here at Tree Limin’ Extreme, we want our guests to have the ultimate Caribbean experience, and our guides have extensive knowledge of the local plants, including genips. They are “da island ting!”

Remember to call for reservations at 340-777-9477

Stay extreme!

-The TLE crew

Categories: Culture, Food, Plants, Tree Limin' Extreme, Virgin Islands | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

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